Top 3 ways students get in trouble for unauthorized collaboration.

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What is Unauthorized Collaboration?

Unauthorized collaboration is working with another person to complete an assignment without the permission of the professor or instructor.

Top 3 ways students face a charge of unauthorized collaboration:

1. Did not read syllabus or directions for the assignment.

The professor may allow collaborative work during a course but then give an assignment that is to be completed on your own. If you don’t read the syllabus or directions and work with someone else, you could face an unauthorized collaboration charge.

2. Discussing the assignment with another student.

You are discussing the assignment with another student and don’t give away any answers but help lead them in the right direction. Maybe you tell them the sources you used or the pages that had the answers. If you end up with an answer that is too similar or sources that are the same, you could face an unauthorized collaboration charge.

3. Online chat groups or study groups.

Online study groups are growing in popularity and are a great way to work with others. However, if an assignment or take-home exam are given and the study group discusses it, you could find yourself in trouble. Even if you did not participate in the discussion, belonging to the group may be enough to charge you with unauthorized collaboration.

Can you help me defend against a charge of unauthorized collaboration?

Yes. I assist students all over the United States defend against unauthorized collaboration or cheating charges. As a lawyer who represents college students, my expertise in the university disciplinary process gives each student the best chance for success.

Richard Asselta is an award-winning student defense lawyer who defends students facing academic integrity and honor code violations throughout the United States.

Click here to read what clients are saying about Richard Asselta on AVVO, a lawyer review website.

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