Accused of having someone do your coursework? An attorney for students discusses.

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With the growth of online college courses, some students have turned to taking short cuts by using tutors to complete assignments, papers, or other coursework. A student shares their login information with the tutor and then this other person logs in as if they are the student. If a university catches a student who does this, chances for suspension or expulsion are high.

I thought I was paying the tutor to help me with coursework, not complete them.

Saying you never meant to have the tutor complete your homework is not a solid defense. Colleges track all sorts of information via their online portals. Login times, IP addresses, length of time logged in, and what was viewed are just a few things that schools keep records of. If the school pulls your information and finds that someone from another location was in your account, that is tough information to defend.

If a student gets caught having someone else take their course, should they try to defend themselves?

That depends on the sanction being imposed. If you are facing a long-term suspension or expulsion, I recommend that a student consider all their options. This means they may have to face an academic integrity hearing. After the disciplinary hearing, a sanction will be recommended.

Can you help me defend an honor code violation?

Yes. I assist students all over the United States defend against cheating, plagiarism, and other honor code violations. My expertise in the college disciplinary process gives each student the best chance for success.

Richard Asselta is a student defense lawyer who fights for students facing academic integrity and honor code violations throughout the United States.

Click here to read what clients are saying about Richard Asselta on AVVO, a lawyer review website.

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