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The cheap way to sue a public college or private college

Students often call me wanting to sue their college. The reasons vary. Some have been kicked out or expelled from their program. Other students have been suspended or put on probation and they cannot attend classes. Some students feel that the school lied to them to get them to enroll. After enrolling, the program was not what was promised. However, filing a lawsuit against anyone, especially a college, can be pricey.

Suing a college is expensive, is there a more affordable alternative for students who can’t afford to sue a school?

The answer: Yes.

What are my options if I can't afford to sue a public college or private college?

I strongly recommend a Demand Letter – I have had great success in getting students what they deserve using a demand letter. The fees are cheap and many times get the student what they want from the school without suing.

What are the benefits of a demand letter instead of suing a public college or private college?

  1. A demand letter is cheaper than a lawsuit against a college. Yes, I am advocating for my clients to spend less, not more money, on legal fees.
  2. Demand letters can achieve a faster result. Lawsuits take time to complete…a very long time. It is not unheard of for a lawsuit to drag on for three or four years. A well-written demand letter could achieve the same results in days or weeks versus years for a lawsuit.

Sometimes suing a public school or private school is necessary and letters will not get the job done. But explore your options first. Make sure whatever lawyer you speak to goes through all of your options - not just the most expensive ones.

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Richard Asselta is an award-winning education lawyer with offices in both Florida and New Jersey. He is experienced in defending students in all types of issues including college suspension and expulsions. Call The Education Lawyers today for a free consultation. We will fight to protect your future. (855) 338-5299

Categories: Blog, Education Law

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